About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
FOXNEWS 15
MSNBCW 10
CNNW 9
CNN 8
KQED (PBS) 8
MSNBC 8
FBC 7
KRCB (PBS) 6
CSPAN 5
WETA 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
WJZ (CBS) 3
WUSA (CBS) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 116
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 118 (some duplicates have been removed)
of problems. we look at the foreign policy agenda when the all-stars join me after the break. i'm phil mic. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, haveuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness. [ phil ] get back to the things that matter most. ask your rhe
of beyond the benghazi incident. i think there's been a dearth of discussion around foreign policy, and in some part that's due because the republicans themselves don't have -- have not verbalized or outlined a foreign policy agenda that's measurably different from that which the president is pursuing. i want to draw your attention to an article in the boston globe, an op ed that says basically the idea of a foreign policy doctrine is outmoded. grand strategies are overrated. they are no more likely to guide this nation to noble he was than painful ones. intervention is fervor, no matter the reason, tends to reflect not reality, but advocacy by people with agendas. one of the issues right now is that the president faces a number of shifting puzzle pieces around the globe. does that, in effect, mean that there cannot be an obama doctrine that applies globally? >> i think it's always helpful for a president and an administration to have a foreign policy and a philosophy about how to approach foreign policy, but you are right that even the greatest enunciation of strategy can be impac
stands on key foreign policy challenges, including iran's nuclear amibitions. salt lake, known city, known for skiing and snow in the winter, not dangerous smog. new pictures coming up as we approach the bottom of the hour and live news right here in "studio b." make it worth watcng. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's 30 shrimp! for $11.99 pair any two shrimp selections on one plate! like mango jalapeƑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. just $11.99. offer ends soon! i'm ryon stewart, and i sea food diffently. just $11.99. offer ends soon! ( bell rings ) they remwish i saw mine of my granmore often, but they live so far away. i've been thinking about moving in with my daughter and her family. it's been pretty tough since jack passed away. it's a good thing you had life insurance through the colonial penn program. you're right. it was affordable, and we were guaranteed acceptance. guaranteed acceptance? it means you can't be turned down because of your health. you don't have to take a physical or answer any health questions.
of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an interview on "60 minutes" that's a joint interview between the president and hillary clinton, a joint exit interview, and this is what the president had to say about hillary clinton's legacy. >> hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. i'm going to miss her. i wish she was sticking around. but she has logged in so many miles i can't b
of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: president obama chose his long-time foreign policy advisor denis mcdonough to be the new white house chief of staff. mr. obama made the announcement this afternoon. he lauded mcdonough, and told him, "i know you'll always give it to me straight, as only a friend can." mcdonough will take over from jack lew, who's been nominated to replace timothy geithner as the next treasury secretary. today was geithner's last day, after four years on the job. in a final interview, he said he's hopeful the economy will strengthen this year. the defense department has begun eliminating the jobs of all 46,000 temporary civilian employees at the pentagon. the announcement today said it's a response to mandatory, across- the-board spending cuts. they're scheduled to take effect march 1, unless congress comes up with alternative cuts. without changes, hundreds of thousands of full-time civilian employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the government of syria called today for thousands of refugees to come home, including those opposed to the regime
. here's kwame holman. >> holman: president obama chose his long-time foreign policy advisor denis mcdonough to be the new white house chief of staff. mr. obama made the announcement this afternoon. he lauded mcdonough, and told him, "i know you'll always give it to me straight, as only a friend can." mcdonough will take over from jack lew, who's been nominated to replace timothy geithner as the next treasury secretary. today was geithner's last day after four years on the job. in a final interview, he said he's hopeful the economy will strengthen this year. the defense department has begun eliminating the jobs of all 46,000 temporary civilian employees at the pentagon. the announcement today said it's a response to mandatory, across- the-board spending cuts. they're scheduled to take effect march 1, unless congress comes up with alternative cuts. without changes, hundreds of thousands of full-time civilian employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the government of syria called today for thousands of refugees to come home, including those opposed to the regime. ne
pass conversation with vice president and director for foreign policy at the brookings institute, martin indyk, on some of the big bets president obama is making during his second term in foreign policy. >>> good monday morning for you on first look. coming up, democrats insist on a single bill and republicans insist they better change or risk further election. >>> a wave of unrest leaves more than 50 dead and a state of emergency in egypt over islamist policy. >>> ice storms and snow headed to the mideast. a possible breakthrough to help migraine sufferers. and the president obama on hillary clinton and the outlook for 2016. >> you guys in the press are incorrigible. i was literally inaugurated four days ago. and you're talking about elections four years from now. >>> it's nice to see you. i'm veronica de la cruz. this week, president obama puts immigration reform front and center on his agenda. on tuesday he will outline his overhaul in a major speech in las vegas, and even a bipartisan group of senators is on board to reform the system that impacts 11 million undocumented peop
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
relations committee, i think a great deal of what good foreign policy about is building personal relationships and building personal relationships with leaders around the world. and the one thing that i've really observed, senator kerry, of you is that you have done that. and we have had so many of these private meetings across over there in the capitol and in the small foreign relations room and i could just feel with meeting with all these leaders, the tremendous respect that they have for you and the ability you are going to have to build on that to make an excellent secretary of state. so i'm very excited about this opportunity for you and i want, in my first question here i wanted to focus on mexico and central america. during the last decade, relations between the united states and mexico have strengthened as a result of our shared security goals relating to the initiative. and one of the pillars of that initiative includes judicial reform and you know this very well. however, the federal government and many of the mexican states have yet to pass legislation which would cha
opens more than 200,000 jobs to women. >> ifill: then, we turn to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two forr national secury advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcast
not talk about the foreign policy, they did not even have a positive economic plan. they said it will be a referendum on an unsatisfactory referendum -- unsatisfactory performance of the incumbent. the stock market was stronger. it was just good enough to drag president obama across the finish line. i think there's plenty to look at. there are plenty of problems. project orca, the get-out-the- vote project. the message is much too limited, too smug, too assumed that people would reject liberal policies because we said they were liberal. the failure to provide a positive reforming conservative agenda. where was the romney health care plan, the positive plan, not just or peeling -- repealing obamacare? i do think scott walker, sam brownback, bob jindal, that is where you alcee conservative principles govern. in washington, a half to boast -- both oppose the obama administration, collaborate, and in the house, they have to figure out what it means to the beat -- to be the majority of one body of congress while the presidency and other house and congress is held by the other party
of the president's meek foreign policy. it was score one for hillary and i think this was an attempt to kind of build on that and move beyond it and talk about hillary clinton's legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. during the hearing what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary on benghazi. the democrats weren't. both sides kept saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. some of the accomplishment. helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya to topple khadafi. assembled the coalition with the toughest sanctions ever on iran and established diplomatic ties with burma. >> i think the examples would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to a case for greatness. the groundwork on burma had been ton by the previous administration and the administration properly followed through on it. are arabs and israelis closer to peace? how about iran and north korea and the nuclear programs? halted or seriously set back? has the reset with russia which she so famously introduced with the photo
foreign policy challenges. >> usama bin laden in documents that came out of abadabad quoted as urging his cohorts to go to other places. to get away from the airplanes. get away from the drones. he specifically encouraged al-qaeda to disburse. and they did. >> senator john kerry is expected to be confirmed next week as america's top diplomat, replacing the former senate colleague who introduced him. he will face multiple crisis across the middle east. >> every day that goes by in syria, it gets worse. every day that goes by it gets worse. >> so there is, it seems to me a very strong impetus that we realize that the present policy is not succeeding. and to look at other options to prevent what is going on for now 22 months. and 60,000 dead. >> republican senator marco rubio said the obama policy on syria has been so disorganized when the situation is resolved, the people there will hate the u.s. >> as iran's best friend. grand central station for terrorists all over the world it was in our national interest to help an opposition form organize itself. >> iran's nuclear program, kerry reiter
at the kerry nomination and foreign policy challenges he'll face, with two men who've served as national security adviser to the president. zbigniew brzezinski held that position with president carter. he's now a counselor at the center for strategic and international studies. stephen hadley served under president george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he s
relationships on behalf of the presidents and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world. but let me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and continuing to work with you for the issues that you champion over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of biological weapons, fighting for human rights against hiv/a.i.d.s. around the world. if your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel and through cooperation where possible and isolation where necessary as in the case of iran. of course, it goes without saying that you have truly been a world leader in one of the most consequential issues of our time, climate change. it heartens me to know that you will be our voice to the world. whatever challenges
't manage to put benghazi into the broader context of the president's weak foreign policy which i'll be important to them when they deal, for instance with the hagel nomination. so it was score one for hillary and i think it was an attempt to build on that and move beyond it and talk about her legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. because, during the hearing, what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary, on benghazi and the democrats weren't. but, both sides kept on saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. and here's some of the points that have been brought up, some of her accomplishments. she helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya, to topple muammar qaddafi. she helped assembly the coalition that imposed the toughest sanctions ever on iran. and, she established diplomatic ties with burma. question, brit: how do you rate hillary clinton's performance, record as our top diplomat. >> i think those examples you cited would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to
controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confirmation because he's of the senate himself, will he be a different secretary of state? >> would expect, charlie, that you'll see a little bit more of the back-channel negotiating style that we associate with a kissinger or jim bake frer senator kerry. he thinks that we need a period of quiet can diplomacy to explore options, to see if there's some way to negotiate some kind of deal over the nuclear issue with iran, to explore some way with russia to get a negotiated political transition in syria. and i think h
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting disease are also priorities. he's expected to easily win approval for the job from the senate. to syria where authorities have called for a million-man prayer at mosques on friday in an effort to stem anti-regime demonstrations. >> the embattled president was also shown on state television praying with syria's spiritual leader to mark the birthday of the prophet mohammad. the fighting around damascus and other cities continues. a french woman who faced 60 years in a mexican jail on kidnapping charges is back in france. >> the 38-year-old was welcomed in paris by relatives and supporters. a mexican supreme cou
attack. joining us now, danielle pletka, vice president foreign policy and defense studies, defense policy studies, i should say, at the american enterprise institute. danielle, thanks for being with us. you wrote a column this week in which your first words were it's hard to like john kerry? [laughter] >> well, i worked for ten years up at the senate foreign relations committee when senator kerry wasn't the chairman, he was one of the other members of the committee. he's just not that popular on capitol hill. he hasn't worked well with other members. that was one of the problems he had when he ran for president. he's perceived as being stand offish, as being uninterested in their issues and in being kind of doctrinaire on policy. jon: but bob corker, the new mexico senator -- we're going to be talking to him next hour -- had glowing words for senator kerry in the hearing this morning. >> every senator walks into a hearing with another senator who's been nominated for something thinking there but for the grace of god go i. it's a collegial institution, but the collegiality is about
.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova." >> our mind tries to put it in rms of robot or human? but the reality is a mix. >> brown: we close with politics and a look at the way forward for the republican party, beginning with today's house vote to extend the nation's debt limit for three months. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: secretary of state hillary clinton testified for the first time today about last september's deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. her testimony befor
choice to carry forward the obama administration's foreign policy, and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> and at her side one of her toughest critics on benghazi. today recounting how he and fellow vietnam veteran john kerry worked together to normalize relations with vietnam in the 1990s. >> helping to establish a relationship with vietnam that serves american interests and values rather than one that remained meyered many mutual resentment and bitterness is one of my proudest accomplishments as a senator. i expect it is one of john's as well. witnessing almost daily his exetch lear statesmanship is one of the highest privileges i've had here. >> kerry's first appearance on the senate foreign relations panel as an activist. some things don't change. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >> i'm tired of -- >> when i first came to washington and testified, i was testifying as part of the group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about, so i respect, i think, the woman who was voicing her concerns about t
white house. he has helped advise president obama on some of his key foreign policy decisions, including drawing down the troops in afghanistan, ending the war in iraq, and also responding to some of the natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, including haiti, and japan. he is someone who has built up a lot of trust here in the white house. you heard that today when president obama talked about him, talked about how much he meant to the staffers here. we should also mention he was pictured in the situation room during the raid on osama bin laden, so this is certainly someone who is very close to the president and will be a key figure moving forward with this white house. andrea. >> thank you so much, kristen welker. david gregory here and pete williams joining us as well. autowe've seen good chiefs of staff and bad. some of the best. jim bakker, ken duberstein, leon panetta in times of trouble. >> howard baker certainly rescuing the ronald reagan second term from don regan, a bad chief of staff by all accounts. what is the pluses and minuses of denis mcdonough. he knows the
in the president's attitude, certainly in his approach to foreign policy. you'll recall from the beginning of administration, the word engagement was, in fact, a guidepost for how we were going to try to deal with adversaries as well as in terms of how you try to deal with resolving conflict. so, i think engagement as such is not new. there's als been a premise to that engagement. it's engagement without illusion. the president has looked at iran as a country that is pursuing a nuclear weapons capability and he's made it clear his objective is to prevent that, not to live with it. his preferred approach is to resolve it through peaceful means, resolve it by engaging with iranians, getting ourselves and others to engage, but to get the iranians to change their objective. the end result may be preferably achieved through diplomacy but the implication is if diplomacy does not work, force may be likely. >> you listen to what the president said in terms of interpretation from israel, couple with what ma hud barack was saying, if that kind of back-channelling doesn't work. are we at odds with is
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 118 (some duplicates have been removed)